Meet Jessie: Participant Profile

Jessie Appleyard is part of our Gen2 cohort and is also the Chair of the Raine Study Community Advisory Committee.

The Community Advisory Committee is made up of participants from the Gen1 and Gen2 cohorts and it is their role to provide input and a community perspective into Raine Study activities.

We had a quick chat with Jessie recently to ask her about his experience with the Raine Study throughout her whole life.

  1. The Raine Study has been part of your life, what does it mean to you? Why do you keep participating?

For me, being part of the Raine Study means that I have the opportunity to contribute to the health and wellbeing of future generations. I keep participating because I want to do anything I can to help make the world a better place in any way that I’m able to.

  1. What has your experience with the Raine Study been over the years? 

I’ve always been excited to be in the study, but over the years, my reasoning for the excitement has changed. When I was younger, it was getting a day off school!

But as I’ve grown up, I feel honestly very lucky to be able to contribute to research and understanding of public health in such a unique way. My mum was always good at encouraging me to participate, but I can’t honestly think of a time when I didn’t want to do any of the follow ups, because even though I’ve not always realised the magnitude of the study, I’ve always understood that it was something important.

  1. Why do you see the Raine Study as important?

This study is so unique. And I don’t think a lot of people realise the potential of what the Raine Study has to offer, not only to our immediate communities but to the world as well.

  1. What has been your most memorable Raine Study moment over the years?

My most memorable moment in the Raine Study was having the honour to speak at Professor Fiona Stanley’s retirement symposium. She is honestly such an inspiring woman who is truly passionate and driven in improving public health.

  1. Why did you choose to be part of the Community Advisory Committee?

I’ve been part of the various feedback groups for the Raine Study since I was 11  but this particular committee is important to me because it’s about how we can keep this amazing thing going. It’s such a valuable resource and I want the Raine Study to be around for as long as possible.

Meet Cornel: Participant Profile

Cornel Scheibling is part of our Gen1 cohort and also a member of the Raine Study Community Advisory Committee.

The Community Advisory Committee is made up of participants from the Gen1 and Gen2 cohorts and it is their role to provide input and a community perspective into Raine Study activities.

Cornel also represents the Community Advisory Committee on the Raine Management Committee, so continues to dedicate a lot of his time to the Raine Study – thanks Cornel!

We had a quick chat with Cornel recently to ask him about his experience with the Raine Study over the last 27 years.

 

What made you sign up to the Raine Study all those years ago?

The study appeared to be worthwhile and given the focus at the time on how ‘outside influences’ could affect health, I thought it would be something good to be part of – especially if it found results that would make a difference.

 

I had three young children at the time, so research into child health was especially important to me.

 

Describe your experience with the Raine Study over the years?

The Raine Study has been carried out professionally and maintained my interest over the years. My original perception of the positive nature of the study has been affirmed with the research and results I have seen.

 

What have you personally been involved in over the years?

I have supported any studies that, as a father of a Gen2 participant, I have needed to be involved in. I have also encouraged my daughter to maintain contact and be involved.

Recently I was involved in the sleep and eye studies for Gen1.

 

Why do you see the Raine Study as so important?

Simply because research is what changes and improves health matters.

 

Finally, why did you put your hand up to be part of the Community Advisory Committee?

In part, to help repay the study for its great work by helping out, but also to learn more about the results and research being undertaken with the data collected by the Raine Study.

500th participant through “27 year follow up” of the Raine Study

Local Kinross resident, Sheridan Brayshaw has done more than her bit for health science, from before she was even born.

Twenty-seven year old Sheridan is part of the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study and has been since her mother was pregnant with her.

She was recently the 500th member of the cohort to participate in a series of health tests as part of the study’s “Generation 2” 27 year old follow up, which is studying the genetic and early life factors that predict cardio-metabolic health and disease.

2900 pregnant women (Generation 1) were recruited into the study from 1989 to 1991 and participants, like Sheridan, have been involved in follow-ups and tests from birth through to young adulthood.

“When I was younger, I never really understood the significance of what I was involved in,” Sheridan said.

“But now I can see just how invaluable the findings are and will continue to be.

“Over 27 years the Raine Study has a comprehensive health history of a group of people like me – including maternal health, environmental impacts on health, genetics, social environment and more.

“I am so proud to be part of it all now,” she said.

The Raine Study is one of the most richly detailed prospective multi-generational cohorts of pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and now early adulthood to be carried out anywhere in the world.

It was established in 1989 to determine how events during pregnancy and childhood influence health in later life.

Four generations of families are now involved in the study with data collected on Grandparents (Generation 0), Parents (Generation 1), Children (Generation 2) and now Grandchildren (Generation 3) from the same family.

With over 450 research papers published since that time, some key findings have included: Establishing the safety of ultrasounds and the standard of prenatal ultrasound scanning worldwide; the identification of genes associated with lung function, birthweight, puberty and language development; the benefits of breastfeeding on weight, asthma, allergies and behavioural problems; the impact of diet on behaviour and school achievement in adolescents and teenagers; the impact of Vitamin D levels on allergies and asthma; and the benefits of organised sport as a child as a trajectory to health in adulthood.

The 27-year follow-up that Sheridan has been involved in includes a range of questionnaires, blood tests, urine samples, faecal samples, MRI scans, full body DXA scans, 3D photography of their faces and more.

Researchers are currently looking into many other areas of study including gut health, vision, mental health, spinal pain, activity and sleep as well as work habits.

Meanwhile, the children of Sheridan’s cohort who have turned two, are now members of the ‘Generation 3 cohort’.  Similar tests are being done on these children as were done on the original Raine Study cohort as part of key longitudinal data collection and Sheridan’s own children are now part of it.

“My children recently were part of their very first Raine Study series of tests at the same time I did my 27 year follow up and gosh, what an overwhelming feeling of nostalgia it was,” Sheridan said.

“I am also so proud to have them be part of something that has been a big part of my own life as I feel like we are really carrying on something so important.”

Three Generations Dedicated to Health Science

Three generations of the Lim family were recognised by Her Excellency, the Honourable Kerry Sanderson AC, Governor of Western Australia on Friday 20st October at the Raine Study Annual Scientific Meeting for 2017, following more than 27 years of involvement in one of the world’s largest cohort studies.

Evelyn and Jonathan Lim are part of the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study which was established in 1989. Jonathan’s 20 month old son, Henry, will become part of the study when he turns two early next year.

Evelyn Lim was one of 2900 pregnant women recruited into the study and her son, Jonathan, has been involved in the study since before he was born and every few years since.

Mrs Lim, who is part of the Raine Generation 1 cohort, said she originally joined the study, partly out of curiosity, but also from an understanding about how difficult it can be to gather participants for research work. However, over the last 27 years she said she recognised the difference they could make as a family.

“Over time it became more and more evident that the longer the study continued, the more important the results would be and we really are honoured to be part of it,” she said.

Jonathan’s son, Henry, will be the third generation of the Lim family to be involved in the study and Jonathan said he felt proud his own son will be part of a study that had been part of his own life for so long.

“We are looking forward to Henry also being able to be part of the study. To be able to compare my own results with his, no doubt will bring a lot of quality information to the area of health science research,” he said.

The Raine Study Annual Scientific Meeting was held at the UWA Club on Friday 20st October and was officially opened by Her Excellency, the Honourable Kerry Sanderson AC Governor of Western Australia.

The meeting was attended by over 85 existing and future Raine Study researchers. Current Raine Study researchers presented preliminary findings using data collected through the Raine Study cohort.

The Raine Study is one of the most richly detailed prospective cohorts of pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and now early adulthood to be carried out anywhere in the world.

It was established in 1989 to determine how events during pregnancy and childhood influence health in later life. With over 450 research papers published since that time, some key findings have included: Establishing the safety of ultrasounds and the standard of prenatal ultrasound scanning worldwide; the identification of genes associated with lung function, birthweight, puberty and language development; the benefits of breastfeeding on weight, asthma, allergies and behavioural problems; the impact of diet on behaviour and school achievement in adolescents and teenagers; the impact of Vitamin D levels on allergies and asthma; and the benefits of organised sport as a child as a trajectory to health in adulthood.

Currently Jonathan and the other members of the Raine Study’s ‘Generation 2’ cohort are having their 27-year follow-up, which includes a range of questionnaires, blood tests, urine samples, faecal samples, MRI scans, full body DXA scans, 3D imaging of their head and faces and more.

Researchers are currently looking into many other areas of study including gut health, vision, mental health, spinal pain, activity and sleep as well as work habits.

Meanwhile, the children of Jonathan’s cohort who have turned two, are now members of the Generation 3 cohort.  Similar tests are being done on these children as were done on the original Raine Study cohort as part of key longitudinal data collection.