Risky Behaviour SIG

SIG Leaders

List of Investigators

Local

  • Dr Karina Allen, University of Western Australia
  • Professor Florian Daniel Zepf, University of Western Australia
  • Professor Dorota Doherty, Biostatistics and Research Design Unit, University of Western Australia, Women and Infants Research Foundation.
  • Dr Ashleigh Lin, Telethon Kids Institute
  • Dr Brennen Mills, Edith Cowan University
  • Dr Kevin Runions, Telethon Kids Institute
  • Dr Monique Robinson, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia
  • Professor Leon Straker, Curtin University
  • Dr Robert Tait, Curtin University

National

  • Professor Martha Hickey, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Royal Women’s Hospital, University of Melbourne
  • Professor Rebecca Ives, Head of School, Public Health and Community Medicine, University of NSW
  • Dr Jennifer Marino, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Royal Women’s Hospital, University of Melbourne; Murdoch Children’s Research Institute
  • Professor George Patton, The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne
  • Professor Rachel Skinner, Paediatrics & Child Health, Children’s Hospital, Westmead
  • Professor Katharine Steinbeck, School of Medicine, University of Sydney

Overview of the current data resources available in the SIG area

  • Risky behaviours SIG data resources include: use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; sexual behaviour, contraception and STI prevention behaviour; driving behaviour.

Overview of current/recent SIG activity

We are continuing to prepare publications and grants around the subject area of health risk behaviour, including with data linkage to WADL.

  • Early life adverse experiences and risky sexual activity in adolescence.
  • Relationship between biological father absence at birth and risky sexual behaviour in adolescence.

Outline of SIG plans for next 5 years

The Risky behavior SIG plans to undertake:

  • trajectory analysis of predictors of health risk behaviour in adolescence and young adulthood (sexual risk behaviour, substance use, injury).
  • assess outcomes in young adulthood (unplanned pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, problematic substance use patterns, injury and road crash, deliberate self harm).
  • Use linkage to WA administrative data sets to inform health and productivity economic modelling of health risk behaviour trajectories.

Brief list of potential student/early career researcher projects

Please contact the Risky behaviour SIG leaders if you are interested in a research project incorporating Risky behaviour data and they will coordinate whom to contact within the group.

  • Health risk behaviour trajectories in adolescence and young adulthood and their association with adverse health and social harms in young adulthood.
  • Substance use behaviours and self-harm/suicide ideation in young adulthood.
  • Continuity of self-harm from childhood to young adulthood.
  • Early life risk factors predicting risky driving behaviour in young adults.
  • Does risky driving behaviour associate with other risk taking behaviours
  • Maternal smoking during pregnancy and adverse mental health and substance use in their adolescent children.

Top 5-10 key findings (with reference)

  • Externalising behaviour problems from age 5 years in boys and 8 years in girls predict a range of risky sexual behaviour in adolescence.  This has important implications for targeting interventions in adolescence. (Skinner SR, Marino J, Rosenthal SL, Cannon J, Doherty DA, Hickey M.  Prospective cohort study of childhood behaviour problems and adolescent sexual risk-taking: gender matters.  Sex Health. 2017;14(6):492-501.
  • This study found evidence suggesting that the number and type of liquor licences in the home neighbourhood was associated with increased alcohol consumption at both age 20 and 22 years.  For example, for each increase in liquor stores, consumption increased by 1.22g/day. (Foster, S., Trapp, G., Hooper, P., Oddy, W.H., Wood, L. and Knuiman, M., 2017. Liquor landscapes: Does access to alcohol outlets influence alcohol consumption in young adults?. Health & Place, 45, pp.17-23).
  • Peer aggression at 14 years is associated with a variety of mental health and substance use problems at age 17 years.  Victims of peer aggression are at increased risk of future internalising symptoms whilst victim-perpetrators were at increased risk of developing later externalising problems such as aggressive and delinquent behaviours and perpetrators were found at increased risk of depression and harmful alcohol use. (Moore SEN, R.E; Sly P.D; Whitehouse, A.J; Zubrick, S. R; Scott, J. Adolescent peer aggression and it’s association with mental health and substance use in an Australian cohort. J Adolescence. 2014;37(1):11-21.

List of indicative recent publications

  • Trapp G, Knuiman M, Hooper P, et al.  Proximity to Liquor Stores and Adolescent Alcohol Intake: A Prospective Study.  Am J Prev Med 2018;54(6):825-830.
  • Foster, S., Trapp, G., Hooper, P., Oddy, W.H., Wood, L. and Knuiman, M., 2017. Liquor landscapes: Does access to alcohol outlets influence alcohol consumption in young adults?. Health & Place, 45, pp.17-23.
  • Skinner SR, Marino JL, Rosenthal SL, Cannon J, Doherty DA, Hickey M. Accepted 29/3/2017. A prospective cohort study of childhood behaviour problems and adolescent sexual risk-taking: gender matters. Sexual Health 14(6):492-501
  • Skinner, S.R., Robinson, M., Smith, M.A., Robbins, S.C.C., Mattes, E., Cannon, J., Rosenthal, S.L., Marino, J.L., Hickey, M. and Doherty, D.A., 2015. Childhood behavior problems and age at first sexual intercourse: a prospective birth cohort study. Pediatrics, 135(2), pp.255-263.
  • Moore, S.E., Norman, R.E., Sly, P.D., Whitehouse, A.J., Zubrick, S.R. and Scott, J., 2014. Adolescent peer aggression and its association with mental health and substance use in an Australian cohort. Journal of Adolescence, 37(1), pp.11-21.
  • Trapp, G.S., Allen, K.L., O’Sullivan, T., Robinson, M., Jacoby, P. and Oddy, W.H., 2014. Energy drink consumption among young Australian adults: associations with alcohol and illicit drug use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 134, pp.30-37.
  • Trapp, G.S., Allen, K., O’sullivan, T.A., Robinson, M., Jacoby, P. and Oddy, W.H., 2014. Energy drink consumption is associated with anxiety in Australian young adult males. Depression and Anxiety, 31(5), pp.420-428.
  • Gill, D., Davis, M., Smith, A., & Straker, L. (2014).  Bi-directional relationships between cigarette use and spinal pain in adolescents accounting for psychosocial functioning.  British Journal of Health Psychology, 19(1), 113-131.
  • Marino, J.L., Skinner, S.R., Doherty, D.A., Rosenthal, S.L., Robbins, S.C.C., Cannon, J. and Hickey, M., 2013. Age at menarche and age at first sexual intercourse: a prospective cohort study. Pediatrics, 132(6), pp.1028-1036.

List of current/recent grants

  • Centre for Research Excellence in Adolescent Health Services; Steinbeck K, Skinner R, Sanci L, Schofield D, Brooks F, Dawson A, Ivers R, Perry L, Liu B, Collin P; National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)/Centres of Research Excellence 2017-2022

Other data

The Raine data also includes critical control variables in evaluating risk behaviours e.g Individual context: Participant behaviour problems (Child Behaviour Checklist) and mental health measures from age 2; childhood cognitive measures; medical history; gender identity and sexual orientation.  Family context: Family structure and parents’ relationship; household income, parental education and employment; primary and secondary caregiver use of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana.  School context:  Participant student conduct, teacher involvement and attitudes towards school.